Science for Kids: Exploring Sound with a Hanger and String

Here’s a fun science activity for kids using common household items. Grab some string and a hanger and explore sound!

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Science for Kids: Exploring Sound with a Hanger~ BuggyandBuddy.com

 

Welcome to another Science Invitation Saturday where we explore science for kids! Last week we discovered what was inside a seed. This week we are doing an experiment with sound. (This post contains affiliate links.)

Materials for Sound Experiment

Procedure for Sound Experiment

  1. Tie the hook of a wire hanger to the center of a large piece of string. (About 3 feet long)
  2. Wrap the ends of the string around your index fingers.
  3. Now put your hands over the openings of your ears while holding the string.
  4. Lean over and swing the hanger so that it taps against a table or door. What do you hear?

Lucy’s Observations & Comments: “It sounds like a bell!” “The hanger got the noise and it went through the hanger and through the string to my ears.”

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Question to Spark More Curiosity & Critical Thinking:

How did it sound? Does banging the hanger against the table sound different if you don’t put the string to your ears? How? How do you think the sound gets to your ears?

 

What’s Going On:

Sound waves are created by the vibration of an object (the wire hanger and string).  When vibrations hit your ear drum, your brain interprets the vibrations as sound. The sound waves can travel through air, liquids and solids. When we listen to the hanger hit the table with the string to our ears, the sound waves are traveling through the solid string and hanger. Since sound waves travel more quickly through solids, we hear the sound more clearly. When we bang the hanger without putting the string to our ears, the sound waves are traveling through air to get to our ears making the sound more quiet.

 

Check out this awesome video showing how sound travels! 


  

Want to go even further?

Even more activities to inspire creativity and critical thinking for various ages: 

    • Try varying the length of the string. Does it affect the sound you hear?
    • Try attaching other objects to the string and testing them out. 
    • Make your own wind chime to hang outside!
    • Make some homemade musical instruments

Fizz, Pop, Bang! 40 Playful Science and Math Activities for Kids


Comments

  1. What a neat idea!! We will have to try this. Thank you for sharing at Sharing Saturday!!

  2. That’s a fun experiment.

    Thanks for sharing on The Sunday Showcase. I’ve pinned to our board.

  3. I put the video on my kids school to do list. We just studied the ear and I really enjoyed this explanation. – Thanks

  4. This is such a neat demonstration. I featured this post at the After School Link up. Thanks for sharing!

  5. What a great experiment!! Thanks for sharing your post with us! I hope you join us again today (yeah I know it’s a day late… linky issues) at Eco-Kids Tuesday!!

  6. I”m saving this for our auditory unit next year. One of the coolest exhibits at a local museum is the one that lets you “see” the sound waves as they make a nearby ribbon move.

    Thanks for linking up to Science Sunday!

  7. Visiting from the Sunday Showcase. I’d love for you to share your family-friendly crafts and ideas at Monday Kid Corner at thejennyevolution.com. See you at the party!

    Jennifer

Trackbacks

  1. […] Exploring Sound with a Hanger: This is another experiment on sound. All you will need is a hanger, some string, and some curiosity! […]

  2. […] Exploring Sound {Buggy and Buddy} […]

  3. […] Exploring Sound by Buggy and Buddy […]

  4. […] to another Science Invitation Saturday where we explore science for kids! Last week we explored sound.  This week we are doing a simple experiment with a plastic baggie and a […]

  5. […] the sense of sound is always a hit with my two kids. Previously we’ve explored sound using a wire clothes hanger and gone on a sound walk. Today we’ll be exploring the sense of sound with our own […]

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